A British seaside pier destroyed by a devastating fire in 2010 has made an incredible comeback in the hands of dRMM Architects. After a seven-year process, the century-old pier in Hastings, England was transformed from its decrepit and dangerous state to a vibrant new public space clad in reclaimed materials. Crafted in collaboration with the community, the Hastings Pier is an inspiring story of sustainable restoration and craft, earning it a place on the shortlist for the 2017 RIBA Stirling Prize, UK’s top architecture award.



Hastings Pier by drMM architects, Hastings Pier RIBA Stirling Prize, Hastings Pier Heritage Lottery Fumd, Hastings Pier renovation, salvaged materials in pier construction, British seaside pier architecture, reclaimed materials from a fire, multipurpose public space by the sea

Originally constructed in 1872 and later topped with a pavilion that survived until the fire, the Hastings Pier enjoyed its heyday as an entertainment destination in the 1930s but later fell into disrepair and ultimately closed in recent decades due to neglect. Rather than restore the Victorian pier to its original design, drMM wanted to craft a pier better suited to the 21st century and focused on designing an attractive multipurpose space with few buildings. The architects not only redesigned the pier, but also wrote the brief and helped raise funds with the Heritage Lottery Fund that paid for structural repairs below deck and partially covered the costs of rebuilding the pier above deck.

Hastings Pier by drMM architects, Hastings Pier RIBA Stirling Prize, Hastings Pier Heritage Lottery Fumd, Hastings Pier renovation, salvaged materials in pier construction, British seaside pier architecture, reclaimed materials from a fire, multipurpose public space by the sea

The most defining building on the new pier is the new visitor center, that’s not positioned at the end of the pier but rather on top of the damaged pier’s weakest section. The cross-laminated timber structure is clad in reclaimed timber salvaged from the fire and is topped with an accessible viewpoint rooftop that doubles as an events space. The only other structures are a pair of circular extensions that house a kitchen, staff facility, and toilet; a group of hut-like trading stalls; and deck furniture built from reclaimed materials as part of a local employment initiative. The 266-meter-long deck was rebuilt with sustainably sourced African Ekki hardwood.

Hastings Pier by drMM architects, Hastings Pier RIBA Stirling Prize, Hastings Pier Heritage Lottery Fumd, Hastings Pier renovation, salvaged materials in pier construction, British seaside pier architecture, reclaimed materials from a fire, multipurpose public space by the sea

Related: Light-filled cancer center harnesses the healing power of nature

RIBA wrote: “From a conservation perspective, this project has reinvigorated a fire-damaged historic structure and facilitated a contemporary and appropriate new 21st century use. The project has been mindful to integrate material from the original pier in the new design, and the process of restoration was used to help train a new generation of craft specialists.”

+ dRMM

Via Dezeen

Images © Alex de Rijke

Hastings Pier by drMM architects, Hastings Pier RIBA Stirling Prize, Hastings Pier Heritage Lottery Fumd, Hastings Pier renovation, salvaged materials in pier construction, British seaside pier architecture, reclaimed materials from a fire, multipurpose public space by the sea

Hastings Pier by drMM architects, Hastings Pier RIBA Stirling Prize, Hastings Pier Heritage Lottery Fumd, Hastings Pier renovation, salvaged materials in pier construction, British seaside pier architecture, reclaimed materials from a fire, multipurpose public space by the sea

Hastings Pier by drMM architects, Hastings Pier RIBA Stirling Prize, Hastings Pier Heritage Lottery Fumd, Hastings Pier renovation, salvaged materials in pier construction, British seaside pier architecture, reclaimed materials from a fire, multipurpose public space by the sea