Gallery: San Francisco Joins the Micro Apartment Craze and Approves 220...

 

Image ©pchurch92

Micro-apartments have been the hot topic in New York lately, but the craze is heading west! The SF Board of Supervisors has approved a trial run that will make 220-square-foot apartments available to residents. The teeny living spaces are meant to provide affordable options for singles to live in densely populated urban areas without having to live in the outskirts of the city.

The 220 square foot apartments are efficiently planned to have all the comforts of home, in an extremely organized manner course. Already popular in London, Poland China, and recently approved by Mayor Bloomberg in New York, San Francisco could join the ranks of the downsizing trend, pending approval from their Mayor Edwin Lee.

Some may see these micro units as being unlivable, but the city is hoping they are a solution to singles who want to live alone in an ever-increasing real estate market. If designed properly, the homes are a way to live comfortably  and affordably in the city center.

San Francisco already has a green mini-apartment complex, called SmartSpace, developed by Patrick Kennedy. The 23 units, designed for young  workers in the tech industry, are larger at 285 to 310 square feet. Each unit banks largely on the specially designed furniture- a hydraulic pop up table, fold up bed and integrated dining table- to keep things open and spacious-seeming. Large windows and high ceilings  also help the flow of the apartments and keep them from feeling like a shoebox.

The newly approved units will be slightly smaller than SmartSpace, and if approved will develop 375 units of the mini-units. With SmartSpace apartments starting at $959, the new units are expected to be even more inexpensive.

Via Wired

Image ©pchurch92

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