Mike Chino

San Francisco's Burrows Street Pocket Park Opens to the Public!

by , 08/15/14

1 burrows street, burrows street pocket park, urban design, green renovation, gardening, public space, the lincoln reimagine project, lincoln, architecture for humanity, rebar, rebar group, rebar studio, architectural digest, san francisco, portola neighborhood association

We first reported on the Burrows Street Pocket Park last October when work was about to begin – and now that it’s complete we have to say that we’re impressed with the results! The park is the result of many months of planning by Architecture for Humanity, City of San Francisco, and the Portola Neighborhood Association, and it was funded by Lincoln as the third edition of The Lincoln Reimagine Project.

1 burrows street, burrows street pocket park, urban design, green renovation, gardening, public space, the lincoln reimagine project, lincoln, architecture for humanity, rebar, rebar group, rebar studio, architectural digest, san francisco, portola neighborhood association

Burrows Street is a one-mile road in San Francisco’s Portola neighborhood that dead ends at the 101 freeway. The area was once prone to vandalism and illegal dumping, and noise from the adjacent freeway made it an unpleasant place to visit. The Lincoln Reimagine Project worked with local designers and the community to transform the space into a welcoming public park.

1 burrows street, burrows street pocket park, urban design, green renovation, gardening, public space, the lincoln reimagine project, lincoln, architecture for humanity, rebar, rebar group, rebar studio, architectural digest, san francisco, portola neighborhood association

What was once a fenced-off slope now features landscaped pathways and trees that will grow to buffer noise from passing traffic. Artist Jason Jagel painted a vibrant mural that depicts elements of the neighborhood wrapped in a warm embrace, and Rebar designed a set of sculptural tables and seats that provide passersby with places to rest and congregate.

Speaking about the park, Lincoln Design manager Solomon Song said: “It had to be inviting – it had to be something that people see and recognize as an inviting space. if you look at the design of the benches, normally benches are hard and rigid – that sends a signal that you’re not wanted there. We tried to use the design language that we used in the Lincoln MKZ, which is inviting and elegant.”

+ The Lincoln Reimagine Project

+ Architecture for Humanity

Photos by Mike Chino for Inhabitat

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