santiago calatrava, green design, green architecture, peace bridge, pedestrian bridge, bike path, green transportation, calgary, alberta, structural steel, cisc

Calatrava’s striking helical design for the candy cane-colored Peace Bridge was completed in 2012, and it provided a remarkable solution to a number of challenging design criteria. Over the 126-meter span, there are no intermediary supports, which reduces the environmental impact of the structure. In addition, the covered bridge has a narrow 7-meter envelope, to allow for high water and ice levels below.

santiago calatrava, green design, green architecture, peace bridge, pedestrian bridge, bike path, green transportation, calgary, alberta, structural steel, cisc

The bridge’s wide deck provides space for pedestrian walkways on both sides, with a bicycle pathway along the center, separated by curbs. Encapsulated by glass walls, the bridge provides year-round safe passage for commuters opting for more environmentally sound transport methods—at the time of the bridge’s inauguration it was expected that 1,500 cyclists and pedestrians would use it every day.

Describing the bridge as a “stunning structure” that has “become a favorite with photographers” the CISC praised the designer’s use of structural steel, and its high strength-to-weight ratio to accommodate the Peace Bridge’s “long span, wide bridge deck, and low structural depth.”

+ CISC

+ Santiago Calatrava

Photos via Shutterstock