Iceberg photo via Shutterstock

After the Gulf of Mexico disaster revealed the perils of deep water drilling to the public, there was a lot of opposition to similar projects proposed in the Arctic. Now, after six years of campaigning, oil company Shell has begun its Arctic exploration campaign despite worldwide protests. However the oil company is facing problems with the $4.5 billion project; a 30 mile by 12 mile block of ice is heading its way.

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Ironically, despite recent reports about Arctic sea ice being at their lowest level for decades, the Shell project in the Chukchi Sea has “made the decision to temporarily move off the well to avoid potentially encroaching sea ice”.

The decision came just 24 hours after Shell begun their ‘historic development’ despite a number of environmental groups warning of the multitude of hazards. In this case, the ‘hazard’ is 30 mile by 12 mile block of ice that is being blown towards Shell’s drill site. Once the iceberg was less than five miles away, Shell made the decision to postpone the operation.

While this may seem like a godsend to activists, Shell has said that the company will continue with the project once the area is safe. The project is part of Shell’s current efforts to drill three wells in the Chukchi Sea and two in the Beaufort Sea this year.

+ Shell Oil

via The Telegraph

Secondary Image © pichugina