Island Bay House, Andrew Simpson, WireDog Architecture, Island Bay House by Andrew Simpson, Island Bay House by WireDog Architecture, floor to ceiling glass doors, white ash, torrefied white ash, passive solar, passive solar home, coastal home, Makoto Masuzawa

When Simpson and his fiancée, Krysty Peebles, decided to build their own house, they knew they wanted something experimental. Undaunted by steep slopes, the couple purchased a small and sharply sloped plot of land with uninterrupted views across the coastal suburb of Island Bay. During the design process Simpson drew inspiration from space-saving Japanese architecture, particularly from the works of architect Makoto Masuzawa. The result is a boxy corrugated metal-clad structure with an unexpectedly airy and spacious feel achieved by a double-height interior and a fully glazed end wall.

Island Bay House, Andrew Simpson, WireDog Architecture, Island Bay House by Andrew Simpson, Island Bay House by WireDog Architecture, floor to ceiling glass doors, white ash, torrefied white ash, passive solar, passive solar home, coastal home, Makoto Masuzawa

Like Masuzawa’s houses, the Island Bay House is open plan and centers on a double-height space. Instead of a second floor, Simpson put in a mezzanine bedroom enclosed by a balustrade constructed from custom-made and space-saving wooden shelving. The undivided interior, which also includes a living area, kitchen, and study, makes the home seem larger. The west-facing wall consists of giant floor-to-ceiling glass doors that open the home up to spectacular views, natural light, and coastal breezes.

Island Bay House, Andrew Simpson, WireDog Architecture, Island Bay House by Andrew Simpson, Island Bay House by WireDog Architecture, floor to ceiling glass doors, white ash, torrefied white ash, passive solar, passive solar home, coastal home, Makoto Masuzawa

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Despite the region’s cold seasonal winds, the home uses passive solar for all its heating needs in the winter. The west-facing glazed walls are oriented to capture the maximum solar heat gain in winter, while the home’s extra-thick five-and-a-half-inch-thick walls traps the heat inside. According to Dwell, Simpson’s favorite feature of the house is the white ash, used on the floors and ceilings, that was torrefied to give it a deep chocolate hue and oiled once put in place.

+ WireDog Architecture

Via Dwell

Images via WireDog Architecture