A new IndieGoGo campaign is raising funds for Beeograph – a smart, sustainable beehive with built-in sensors that monitor interior conditions to further research on mass bee deaths around the globe. While many theories have been proposed about the cause of colony collapse disorder, this research will help scientists identify the true cause and scope of the problem. Incredibly, this is the first organized, global effort to monitor beehives in this way, despite international concern about the world’s falling bee populations.

The crowdfunding campaign allows ordinary people to sponsor a beehive, which will be tended by a professional beekeeper on the donor’s behalf. The device itself will monitor the light, humidity, temperature, and weight of the hive, as well as the sounds and motion of the bees. Each Beeograph hive will be placed in what the team describes as an “environmentally clean” location. Then, the collected data will be transmitted to the donor’s devices, so they can monitor the health and lifespan of their adopted bee family. Donors at larger tiers can even have a camera installed in their hive so they can check in on their bees at any time.

Related: 44% of US honeybee colonies died off last year

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If you choose, you can have the organic honey harvested from your bees delivered directly to your door. (There’s also a vegan option available for those who want to sponsor a beehive but don’t want to take honey from the hive.) Through this project, researchers hope to give ordinary people the opportunity to participate in scientific research and be part of a worldwide sustainability movement.

The hives themselves are made of natural and sustainably sourced materials – even the electronic components come directly from companies with certified fair working conditions. All of the data gathered through the project will be kept in a storage center partially powered by renewable energy.

+ Beeograph on IndieGoGo