Lea Stewart

SNUGGLES: Stay in a Modular Hamster Tunnel Hotel

by , 08/10/09

snuggles, german, berlin, hotel, concept, public art, raumlabor, urbanism, architecture, vertical living, mobile, modular, textiles

This modular, mobile Snuggles hotel allows you to shack up in pods for an artsy camping experience not dissimilar to staying in oversized hamster cage tunnels. The project crosses the boundaries of temporary architecture and public art with its linkable framework, configurable platforms, and waterproof textile coverings. Able to be set up on a beach, in the forest, or in an urban environment, Snuggles offers a fun experience that’s on par with even the trendiest hostels.

snuggles, german, berlin, hotel, concept, public art, raumlabor, urbanism, architecture, vertical living, mobile, modular, textiles

Snuggles was designed by Berlin-based Raumlabor, which says that it is not an architecture firm, but rather an interdisciplinary team interested in urbanism, and the study of public and private space. The modular system was intended for use as comfortable, safe housing for travelers to festivals, workshops, or other artistic events. Each unit features a three-sided pod with a window and tunnel access to a central pod with sanitary facilities.

We love that their hotel design uses the barest of resources, and is totally mobile and reconfigurable. The pods can built on stilted platforms, which gives the the eco advantage of adapting to their environment without disturbing it. This vertical living configuration could be even more sustainable than camping, with the ability to fit more travelers per square foot of land used.

The other great thing is that the guests have a stake in a sort of public art design experiment. In an interview with Pantheon Magazine, Markus Bader of Raumlabor says that “temporary use means that there is a temporary user. That is, someone who has his own idea how to use space and what can be done with it. A temporary user can be another kind of developer.” Snuggles is a perfect example of this study of user-transformed design, since each traveler would naturally customize their room, and give passersby a glimpse into your hamster-tunnel turned art space.

+ Raumlabor

Via Dailytonic

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