Jill Fehrenbacher

Solar-Powered Citizen Eco-Drive Watch

by , 11/29/07

Citizen Solar powered Eco-Drive Watch, solar powered watch, eco chic watch, sleek eco chic watch, green watch, sustainable watch, eco watch, solar watch, solar powered watch, Citizen Eco Drive

When we discovered Citizen’s fabulous solar powered Eco-Drive watches, we suddently wondered why ALL watches aren’t solar powered. Solar power for watches makes perfect sense if you think about it – watches need to be constantly charged with small amounts of energy, watch batteries aren’t sustainable, and are frustrating to replace, and most watches see at least some light every day. This sleek black minimalist Eco-Drive watch is so foxy you’ll want to wear it every day.

$135 from Amazon.com

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


7 Comments

  1. Sam Samuelson December 28, 2007 at 7:48 am

    Post by “Scott” is the most incredibly uninformed I have read yet: I’ve had a Pulsar Solar watch for 8 years and, night or day, rain or shine it has never, ever come close do needing the kind of attention Scott thinks it needs. Went to Japan once, accidentally left in a glasses case and failed to find it for four months. Total, utter darkness but when I found it, it had kept perfect time, no loss whatsoever, maybe three minutes slow. Clue before you review.

  2. Stuart December 7, 2007 at 4:13 am

    I’ve had a similar solar powered Citizen watch for four years and I love it!

    The instructions say that if it doesn’t get enough light to charge properly then the second hand will only move every two seconds but I’ve NEVER seen this happen – even when I took it out of the enclosed box when it was brand new.

  3. Armel November 30, 2007 at 1:46 pm

    Shame on you for promoting Amazon.com in this post. Amazon was recently named on of the Internet’s “Bottom 10″ for their massive promotion of goods from China, East Timor and the Sudan which are frequently produced with child and slave labor as well as with unsustainable and destructive production methods.

  4. Tyrone November 30, 2007 at 1:01 am

    Come on people, although it can store plenty of power with exposure to minutes of ANY light source and one good day in the sun can power it for 45-180 days or so, one can’t help but think of the tried and true mechanical automatic watches that have been made for hundreds of years.

  5. Jay November 29, 2007 at 9:30 pm

    My Dad’s Omega watch worked on using kinetic energy obtained from moving your arm around during the day. No battery, solar, electirc at all – just movment.

    Thing was flawless until Katrina flooded it for a month and ruined it.

    Why don’t we see more of this type of tech being used????

  6. scott November 29, 2007 at 6:36 pm

    Why on earth would you want to rely on solar power for a watch? It isn’t likely to get much exposure during any but the warmest times of year thanks to shirtsleeves and would be incapable of being charged overnight while you slept. It seems a rather inefficient, wasteful, and needless attempt to replace the centuries old technology of kinetic watches or even the more contemporary automatic watches that use electricity rather than springs to keep things ticking.

  7. Leisureguy November 29, 2007 at 5:54 pm

    Even better (for me) are the Casio solar-powered digital watches that automatically synch with the NIST time signal every night. It’s part of their G-Shock series, so they are also awesomely sturdy. I’ve had one for a couple of years, and it’s great: no worries about battery, no worries about whether the time is accurate, etc.

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
What are you looking for? (Solar, HVAC, etc.)
Where are you located?