Architecture firm LIAG completed the beautiful M House, a contemporary Dutch villa that boasts a small energy footprint. Clad in handsome western red cedar, the two-level home is partly buried underground while the upper level appears to float atop a raised mound of Marram grass. The home is powered by solar energy—the 78 rooftop solar panels are angled at 10 degrees to hide them from street view—and is heated and cooled by an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage system.



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Located in Weert in the southern Netherlands, the 800-square-meter M House was built adjacent to the South Willem’s Canal. To take advantage of waterside views, LIAG designed an elevated timber-clad volume with generous amounts of southeast glazing directly facing the ever-busy canal. Most of the glazing is set back to protect the interior from solar heat gain, however, two glass-clad volumes—a kitchen in the southeast and an indoor swimming pool in the northwest—protrude on either side of the timber framework. The indoor swimming pool has a separate heating installation with a heat pump system and overlooks the backyard.

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The elevated timber volume houses the communal areas, including the living room, dining area, study, and kitchen. Arnie van Dun interieurarchitectuur led the interior design and installed mobile hanging cabinets that double as room dividers, giving the homeowner the option to rearrange the upper level into different configurations. White-painted walls and clean lines give the interior a bright and modern appearance. The smaller lower level that’s partially embedded into the earth contains the bedrooms, storage areas, a cinema, and a garage. The light-filled home has demand-controlled ventilation installed. FLOS lighting led the lighting design.

+ LIAG

Via ArchDaily

Images via LIAG, by Ben Aarts