Stuart Haygarth’s talent lies in re-imagining waste into striking lighting design. As a London based designer, his work falls into an increasingly present design movement that is part salvage, part make-do-and-mend, and 100% stunning. This approach to more sustainable product ranges seems to be a recipe for success, as both the Deptford Design Market Challenge and Trash Luxe at London‘s recent Design Festival centered around recycled materials. Stuart’s fixtures have long been an Inhabitat favorite, including his Disposable wine glass chandelier and his beach-waste Tide chandelier.

Stuart Haygarth, Millenium Chandelier (Colour) Unlit, Stuart Haygarth Website Photography, Stuart Haygarth, Spectacle (Chandelier), Ariana Mouyiaris, recycled design, reclaimed design, recycled materials, reused materials

His Millenium Chandelier, shown above, is made from an assortment of exploded Party Poppers and debris collected from London’s millennial celebrations. Originally created as a ‘one-off’ piece, subsequent editions have followed including one exclusively constructed from black poppers.

Turning various forms of flotsam into fashioned design piece is nothing new, as we’ve seen with his Tide Chandelier. Although trained in graphic design and photography, Haygarth’s fresh approach to found objects: meticulously collecting, categorizing and crafting new meaning through design, makes his sculptural practice a green benchmark in product innovation. This idea of celebrating the ordinary, reusing forgotten objects instead of manufacturing new materials and generating new waste, is a trend we hope to see more of.

+ Stuart Haygarth