alex symes, alexander symes architect, dresden mobile, australia, recycled glasses, recycled eyeglasses, recycled eyewear, recycled building materials, gold polycarbonate, natural ventilation, photovoltaic, battery backup system

The Australian architect describes the project as a demonstration of efficient resource use. In a statement on the project’s website, he explains that “sustainable materials in architecture is about thinking how we can most efficiently use the world’s resources in a respectful manner, I believe we need to create closed loop manufacturing systems where no material goes to landfill or pollutes our natural ecosystems, but is rather up-cycled to minimize resource depletion and environmental degradation.”

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alex symes, alexander symes architect, dresden mobile, australia, recycled glasses, recycled eyeglasses, recycled eyewear, recycled building materials, gold polycarbonate, natural ventilation, photovoltaic, battery backup system

In the portable shop, Dresden cuts precision prescription lenses right on site. All components of the eyeglasses are interchangeable for eco-friendly repairs, and everything is recyclable as well. Inspired by the tiny house movement, Symes designed the portable workshop to be a sustainable example of portable architecture, while housing a sustainable business. Lens edging equipment is powered by a generator due to its high voltage needs, but most other electrical equipment, including lighting and the point of sale system, are powered by built-in photovoltaics and the accompanying battery storage system.

To create a portable workshop that would also be lightweight, Symes called for a polycarbonate facade, which blocks out 70 percent of solar radiation and insulates better than double-glazed materials. Dresden Mobile’s awnings open to allow cross ventilation, so that climate control systems are not necessary. When closed, the polycarbonate sides allow daylight to filter through to the interior, further reducing the need for additional artificial lighting.

+ Alexander Symes Architect

Images via Brett Boardman Photography