cellulose

New Solvent Could Shrink the Paper Industry’s Energy Footprint By 40 Percent

New Solvent Could Shrink the Paper Industry’s Energy Footprint By 40 Percent

Paper photo from Shutterstock Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology recently teamed up with paper industry specialists to develop a new solvent that could drastically change the way the

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Plant-Based Cellulose Super Material is as Stiff as Steel

Plant-Based Cellulose Super Material is as Stiff as Steel

Recent scientific findings that unveil the remarkable structural performance of plants could completely change what we think of as "green architecture." Researchers at Purdue University who conducted an

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Virgina Tech Researchers Create Food from Non-Edible Plant Cellulose

Virgina Tech Researchers Create Food from Non-Edible Plant Cellulose

Few people turn to a tree branch or corn husk for a meal, and for good reason. The cellulose found in the cell walls of plants is enormously difficult for the human digestive system to break down. The

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Brown University Identifies Hungry Microbe That Could be Key to Turning Biomass Into Biofuel

Brown University Identifies Hungry Microbe That Could be Key to Turning Biomass Into Biofuel

The quick rise and depressing downward spiral of the ethanol industry proved that using food to make biofuel is both wasteful and costly. Non food-based biofuels, such as those derived from grasses,

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Super-Durable Material Made from Wood Waste is Stronger, Cheaper, and Lighter Than Kevlar

Super-Durable Material Made from Wood Waste is Stronger, Cheaper, and Lighter Than Kevlar

Ever wondered why paper beats rock in a game of roshambo?  It turns out that cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) derived from wood pulp extract can be used to create one of the strongest materials known to

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Algae Could Be the Key to Ultra-Thin Biodegradable Batteries

Algae Could Be the Key to Ultra-Thin Biodegradable Batteries

Algae is often touted as the next big thing in biofuels, but the slimy stuff could also be the key to paper-thin biodegradable batteries according to researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden.

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