Kate Clark, Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

Among the most striking sculptures in Late Harvest is Kate Clark’s “Licking the Plate,” a hybrid creature with an animal body and a feminine human face. The piece forces viewers to decide whether they identify more with the creature’s animal or human qualities, according to the curators.

Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

Belgian artist Wim Delvoye’s tattooed pig is one of the most unusual pieces in the show. Delvoye sedated and tattooed a live pig, thereby transforming it into a four-legged work of art. That might sound like animal cruelty, but wait: According to Delvoye, the live pigs are then “indulged with comfortable, heated indoor-outdoor pigsties, and plentiful food; they live out their lives fully before succumbing to natural causes.”

Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

We often think of wild animals as existing in a world that’s completely separate from human culture. But as Mark Dion’s “Concrete Jungle” sculpture observes, there are many nocturnal urban animals that adapt to and thrive in our urban environments.

Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

Perhaps the most unsettling installation in the Late Harvest exhibit is Berlinde D Bruyckere “P XII,” which consists of a featureless horse lying on the floor. “I took the motif of the dead horse as a symbol of loss in war, wherever it happens,” explains Bruyckere. “I need the horse because of its beauty and its importance to us. It has a mind, a character and a soul. It is closest to us human beings.”

Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

Using thousands of colorful butterfly wings, artist Damien Hirst created three large panels that are made to look like stained-glass windows. To Hirst, the butterfly wings represent fragility, but in this context they also evoke the sacred.

Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

David Brooks’ “Imbroglios” sculpture offers a powerful commentary on humanity’s desire to control nature. The wooden structure represents a phylogenetic tree, which traces the ancestry connecting humans to the Atlantic tarpon. But the fish don’t fit into our tidy categories, and they leap over the barriers.

Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare’s “Revolution Kid (Fox)” features a taxidermied fox holding a 24-karat gold gilded gun and wearing bright batik Victorian-style clothes. The sculpture memorializes the “Blackberry Riots” of 2011 in London, when ethnic minorities used mobile technology to organize protests.

Reno, Nevada, Nevada Museum of Art, Late Harvest, A+E Conference

Artist Petah Coyne began working on “Untitled #1240 (Black Cloud)” in 1996, when a friend spotted several Victorian-era taxidermy birds that had been thrown in a dumpster. Coyne gathered them all, and created a large installation with them, partly inspired by Dante’s Inferno. “I just think it’s so beautiful, because the souls are gone, and the birds remain,” she explained at the conference.

The Late Harvest exhibit will be on display at the Nevada Museum of Art until January 18, 2015.

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+ Late Harvest

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