Gallery: The Distort House is a Spliced Home That Adds A Pinch of Green...

 
Indonesian architects TWS & Partners have put a modern green twist on traditional Southeast Asian housing with their new jigsaw shaped home called the Distort House. When most people think of a house, they picture a solid, four-sided structure with a door, a roof, and windows. Distort House intentionally refutes this assumption, literally breaking up our preconceptions of what a home should look like.

Located directly across the street from a public park in Jakarta, Distort House is placed at the very back of its large plot and turned a slight 15% to optimize the expansive yard space. The grand green entrance breaks up the monotony of the residential block while opening and lightening the front of the home. The structure itself is divvied into offset levels including a private upper area built specifically to capture the breathtaking views and fresh scents of the park. The lower level living room is especially spectacular because it is built with no walls or windows at all. Occupants feel as though they are living outside in the tropical atmosphere. The completely open space is not only for gathering and relaxation, but also serves as the home’s main channel for breathing, allowing fresh air to naturally ventilate throughout the different sections.

The varying levels are bridged together by a twisting staircase that travels inside, outside, up, and down the home in an Escher-like fun house way. The stairs cross over a courtyard that blurs the line between interior and exterior, seemingly existing in both parts of the house.

A house so connected with nature certainly includes a number of green features as well. Most of the building materials are recycled, including the steel beams and even the wood for every single window. Using the original wood frames, each window is a unique size and style, creating a funky patchwork along the sides of Distort Home. Exposed concrete also doubles as shelving and cooling agents for the house.

The home’s unglazed terracotta roof not only provides shade but also proves to be very porous, allowing air to flow through the house while retaining much of the tropical heat to keep the building at a comfortable temperature. Definitely the coolest on the block (literally and figuratively), the house might spur neighbors to take after it and begin a trend of distortion.

+ TWS and Partners

Via architizer

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >