Back in 2013, the Bjarke Ingels Group broke ground on what is slated to become the world’s cleanest power plant. Located in Copenhagen, Denmark, the 95,000 sq m Amagerforbrændingen Energy Plant will not only turn the city’s trash into energy, but the entire facility will also double as a green-walled ski slope—no, really. But now BIG is seeking the public’s help with one last feature of the power plant; a generator that will send a ring of steam over Copenhagen every time one tonne of carbon dioxide is released, providing a clear depiction of our contribution to climate change.


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The steam ring generator would be an informative art piece developed in collaboration with Berlin-based artists realities:united, the aerospace organization Peter Madsen’s Rumlaboratorium, as well as the Danish Technical University. The custom chimney, the first of its kind, will utilize three steam lines—each with different pressure—to emit a large ring of steam each time one tonne of carbon dioxide is released from the plant.

So far, the team has built two separate smaller-scale prototypes of the chimney, one in August of 2014 and one in April of 2015. They have been able to successfully produce the desired effect at one-tenth of the size of the final product and are working towards building a third and final prototype that will be to a scale of one-third, emitting a steam ring that will ascend five meters in height and be 2.5 meters in diameter.

And, in order to do this, BIG and friends have turned to Kickstarter. Having funded the previous two prototypes themselves, they’re looking to raise $15,000 for the final prototype. Sure, it’s a little odd to see Bjarke Ingels turn to crowd-sourced funding, but it does provide a pretty cool way to be involved with a truly bizarre and potentially quite wonderful project.

+ Kickstarter

+ Bjarke Ingels Group