London tourists may soon get a chance to spend sleep underground at the upcoming subterranean LDN Hotel, the first of its kind in the city. Ian Chalk Architects is working on the sustainable hotel, which will reportedly feature a plethora of plants, and air that’s cleaner than outside.


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The underground hotel, slated for construction in London’s West End under St Giles Hotel, will house up to 166 guests at affordable prices. The LDN Hotel would sprawl across what is currently an underground parking lot on the fourth and fifth floors below ground. The LDN Hotel design will be similar to Japanese pod hotels, according to Design Curial, except with a toilet and shower in the room.

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While critics raised concern about air quality in an underground hotel, the hotel design features a mechanical ventilation system for air purification that is said to ensure the air will be even fresher than outdoors.

Sustainability was also said to be an important consideration, though it is yet unclear what features would make it so, apart from comprising a better use of space than the disused parking lot. Wood paneling, flourishing plants that improve air quality, and bright rooms are among the planned hotel’s interior features.

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While some may balk at the idea of staying in a room without a window, the hotel will be near to tourist attractions, according to planning inspector David Prentis, and offer unique budget accommodations. The initial proposal for the underground hotel was rejected, but planning officers have since granted permission for its construction.

Via Design Curial and Evening Standard

Images via Ian Chalk Architects