Scientists have long sought to replicate with fusion reactors the sun’s ability to produce energy through nuclear fusion. But it’s taking too long for Tokamak Energy, a UK-based company that wants to speed up the progress with mini reactors. Their small Spherical Tokamaks makes it possible to accelerate tests, which is difficult in other laboratories because of the specific conditions required; they hope to provide commercially-available fusion energy as soon as 2030.


Tokamak Energy, Spherical Tokamak, ST40, United Kingdom, science, technology, energy, clean energy, alternative energy, fusion, fusion reactor, reactor, nuclear fusion, fusion power, fusion energy

Nuclear fusion is difficult to replicate on Earth because it requires extremely high temperatures and pressures. Scientists have broken records on the path to fusion energy for all, but there’s still a long way to go; a recent record hit only 70 seconds of high-performance plasma operation, and that was still an exciting milestone. But Tokamak Energy thinks they could accelerate us closer to fusion energy with their mini tokamaks.

Related: Germany’s massive nuclear fusion reactor is actually working

Tokamak Energy, Spherical Tokamak, ST40, United Kingdom, science, technology, energy, clean energy, alternative energy, fusion, fusion reactor, reactor, nuclear fusion, fusion power, fusion energy

Spherical Tokamaks can “achieve a much higher plasma pressure for a given magnetic field than conventional tokamaks,” according to the company, which they say means their smaller reactors are more efficient. The tokamaks’ small size also offers an advantage in contrast to other fusion reactors being developed around the world, which have cost billions of dollars.

At the end of April this year, Tokamak Energy switched on their third reactor in five years. They hope the ST40 will hit 100 million degrees Kelvin – seven times hotter than the Sun’s center and required for controlled fusion – next year.

The company is working to be the first to offer commercially viable fusion, in just a little over 10 years. When his company turned on the ST40, Tokamak Energy CEO David Kingham said, “We will still need significant investment, many academic and industrial collaborations, dedicated and creative engineers and scientists, and an excellent supply chain. Our approach continues to be to break the journey down into a series of engineering challenges, raising additional investment on reaching each new milestone. We are already halfway to the goal of fusion energy, with hard work we will deliver fusion power at commercial scale by 2030.”

Via the BBC and Tokamak Energy (1,2)

Images via screenshot