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The cabins were designed for Colorado Outward Bound School in Leadville, one of 40 schools in the world run by Outward Bound. The cabins have a certain rustic charm, and blend into their surroundings unobtrusively. Each cabin was built on an elevated platform to reduce its environmental impact, with a corrugated metal snow roof to protect the boxy structure from the elements. The wood-and-steel construction means minimal maintenance will be needed to keep up their pristine condition. The cabins measure between 140 and 200 square feet, and were all constructed on-site in just three weeks. The cabins even have little covered porches.

Related: Pair of tranquil, hillside cabins provide space for art, yoga, and guests

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Inside, the design is stripped down and minimalist, lined with milled birch plywood. Each cabin has multiple fold-down bunks, and small desks perfect for journaling about the day’s wilderness adventures. Picture windows offer a great vantage point for the world outdoors, good for observing the forest in bad weather. The box enclosure of each cabin and its porch are supported by a steel frame, which doubles as storage for outdoor equipment like mountain bikes, kayaks, and skis.

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In recent years, architecture students at the University of Colorado program have also designed cabins for the Navajo reservation Utah. That project used reclaimed materials for a low-impact dwelling, conceived and built on a shoestring budget.

Via Dezeen

Images via Jesse Kuroiwa/University of Colorado