Normally, one of the main functions of a house is to keep the elements out. But this family house in Japan has a large, hollowed-out chimney that gathers rainwater, light and fresh air into a glass-encased room to let the elements in. Architect Masaki Yoneda designed the house for a family of three who wanted to have a bit of the outside environment present in their living space.

Puddle house, Japan, rainwater collection, rainwater, Masaki Yoneda, green architecture, rainfall, James Turrell, Japan, natural light

The house, dubbed the “Puddle”, is located in a densely populated area of Matsusaka City in Japan‘s Mie prefecture. The large opening in its roof surface extends down into the living area and forms a small room where a puddle of rainwater brings the residents closer to nature. It shrinks and grows depending on the amount of rainfall, constantly changing with the weather.

Puddle house, Japan, rainwater collection, rainwater, Masaki Yoneda, green architecture, rainfall, James Turrell, Japan, natural light

Related: Japan’s CYIN House on stilts shelters a small winter garden

The chimney also brings natural light into the interior and enables natural ventilation. The design was inspired by artist James Turrell, and creates a similar effect of spatial immersion. It brings the great outdoors indoors for a lifestyle more in-tune with nature.

+ Masaki Yoneda

Via Spoon & Tamago

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