Sitting just outside of the historic town of Longli in China‘s Guizhou province, this solitary lookout shelter channels the isolation and historic struggles of the local indigenous people and incorporates elements that embrace both the past and present. Architect Li Hao designed the structure, named The Mirrored Sight, as a contemporary one-person shelter that, thanks to its mirror surfaces, blurs the line between man-made and natural landscapes.


Shelter The Mirrored Sight, Li Hao, shelter, bamboo shelter, China, locally sourced materials, bamboo, green architecture

The local area was the subject of migration from multiple different cultural groups 600 years ago, resulting in a unique hodgepodge of styles in influences. The structure references the blending of these different groups in the region and the isolation that many some cultures felt as they migrated across Longli. The shelter is connected to the old town by a stone bridge which the locals cross to farm, fish, do laundry and wash dishes. The lower floor is large enough for one person to sit and rest, while the upper floor provides views of the surroundings.

Shelter The Mirrored Sight, Li Hao, shelter, bamboo shelter, China, locally sourced materials, bamboo, green architecture

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The entrance of the structure facing the old stone bridge, connecting it to the old town. The northern facade, which runs parallel to the axis of Longli town, is covered with locally sourced bamboo, while the southern facade features Pilkington Mirropane (single-transparent glass). Reflecting the scenes of Longli’s daily life south to the river, the glass blurs the line between history and the present. West-facing windows frame a view of the Longxi Bridge, a bridge that was built in Ming dynasty, and forms a shape of bow and arrow together with two roads by the river.

Via Archdaily

Photos by Kang Wei