Gallery: Tokyo’s Eco-Cycle Park Bicycle Elevator Stores 144 Bikes Under...

 

Tokyo’s underground bicycle storage system looks more like an elaborate mechanism from a sci-fi movie than a parking lot for cycles. Put into motion with a single push of a button, the Eco Cycle Anti-Seismic Underground Bicycle Park, built by Japanese engineering firm Giken Seisakusho Co. LTD is just seven meters wide, but it’s deep enough to store 144 bicycles. The system provides the city’s bike users with an efficient parking solution that ensures complete safety for cycles. Hit the jump to see a video of the bicycle park in action!

This emission-free way of navigating the city comes with a set of issues-bikes get stolen, while large bike parking areas tend to clutter the streets. Giken’s Eco-Cycle can hold up to 800 bikes and helps eliminate the nuisance of bicycle parking on the pavement.

The Japanese firm combined their long term experience of press-in technologies and developed the Eco-Cycle Underground Park with the design concept of “Culture Aboveground, Function Underground”. The user presses in a code and sends his or her bike on its way to underground safety.

+ Eco-Cycle Underground Bike Park

Via Core77

Photos by Flickr user Danny Choo

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6 Comments

  1. Mohammad Haytham AL Homsi January 14, 2014 at 3:30 am

    The subject is interested but I would like to get more information/details about the car parking ( i.e. Dimensions , depth and some technical details ) .
    Thanks and Regards,
    Mohammad Haytham AL Homsi
    +971506125094
    United Arab Emirates

  2. Colin Roch August 6, 2013 at 11:54 am

    I would have though that this bike storage system is the least needed in Japan as I noticed that most/many people don’t even lock up their bikes! I suppose it depends what kind of bike you are riding and I guess there’s the space issue in Japan-any excuse to make a robot!

  3. Phil Cooper July 16, 2013 at 6:01 pm

    Elegant storage solution, but I don’t think it would work where I live: The bottom of the shaft would be 20 to 30 meters below the local water table. Perhaps a silo extending 40 to 50 meters above ground could work, however.

  4. Bart Stikkers June 16, 2013 at 10:36 am

    Too bad this won’t help much at the central train stations of major Dutch cities, where there are on average 10,000 or more bicycles…

  5. brownlace June 13, 2013 at 4:47 pm

    This story is so incredibly amazing, it’s driving me nuts. I hope the USA adopts this technology…and I don’t even ride bicycles, but I want to. Gah!

  6. Keith Glass June 13, 2013 at 3:54 pm

    This is basically a scale-up and refinement of robotic tape systems for data centers, but looks well-engineered and an excellent adaptation of an already-existing technology.

    Nicely done !!

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