Toronto’s freezing beaches will soon be a hotspot of activity. The third annual Winter Stations design competition recently unveiled this year’s eight winners, a series of temporary art installations that will take over the city’s east end beaches beginning February 20. These interactive pieces will be built atop ordinary lifeguard stands and offer designs ranging from a Japanese onsen-inspired installation to a modern lighthouse.



I See You Ashiyu by Asuka Kono and Rachel Salmela, North by studio PERCH, Collective Memory by Mario García and Andrea Govi, BuoyBuoyBuoy, The Beacon, Flotsam and Jetsam by University of Waterloo, Midwinter Fire, Illusory. Toronto Winter Stations winners, Winter Stations 2017

The Toronto Winter Stations competition selected five professional and three student teams to create temporary sculptures for the Toronto beachfront created under the theme of “Catalyst.” The competition seeks visionary designs that reinvent the waterfront landscape into an inviting and memorable place during a time of year when the frozen beaches are normally deserted. “Winter Stations 2017 delivered, once again, gutsy and lyrical transformations of ordinary lifeguard stands,” said Lisa Rochon, Winter Stations Design Jury Chair. “Visitors will be able to touch and feel their way along the beach, experiencing luminous shelter from the wind, warming waters for their feet, and designs that celebrate the Canadian nation of immigrants.”

I See You Ashiyu by Asuka Kono and Rachel Salmela, North by studio PERCH, Collective Memory by Mario García and Andrea Govi, BuoyBuoyBuoy, The Beacon, Flotsam and Jetsam by University of Waterloo, Midwinter Fire, Illusory. Toronto Winter Stations winners, Winter Stations 2017

Related: 7 Burning Man-style winter stations unveiled for Toronto’s snowy shores

The winning entries in the professionals category include: Asuka Kono and Rachel Salmela’s I See You Ashiyu, an installation where visitors can dip their feet into a Japanese hot spring-inspired basin; studio PERCH’s North, a suspended forest of 41 trees hung upside down; Mario García and Andrea Govi’s Collective Memory built from recycled bottles in reference to a statistic that says nearly one-half of the Canadian population over the age of 15 will be foreign born or a child of a migrant parent by 2031; Dionisios Vriniotis, Rob Shostak, Dakota Wares-Tani and Julie Forand’s BuoyBuoyBuoy, a reflective sculpture mimicking the motion of multiple buoys; and Joao Araujo Sousa and Joanna Correia Silva’s modern interpretation of a lighthouse in The Beacon, which will also double as a drop-off location for non-perishable items like canned food or clothes.

I See You Ashiyu by Asuka Kono and Rachel Salmela, North by studio PERCH, Collective Memory by Mario García and Andrea Govi, BuoyBuoyBuoy, The Beacon, Flotsam and Jetsam by University of Waterloo, Midwinter Fire, Illusory. Toronto Winter Stations winners, Winter Stations 2017

The selected student works include University of Waterloo’s Flotsam and Jetsam that speaks to the ills of plastic consumption; Humber College School of Media Studies & IT, School of Applied Technology’s the Illusory that uses mirrors to distort perspectives; and Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto’s Midwinter Fire, which immerses visitors in a miniature version of a Southern Ontario winter forest.

+ Winter Stations

Via ArchDaily

Images via Winter Stations