mexico, toyo ito, Museo Internacional del Barroco, Federico Bautista Alonso, art museum, baroque museum, unesco world heritage site, Atlixcáyotl Territorial Reserve

The 2013 Pritzker Prize winner created a modern building from a dense collection of curved walls, tucked into an organic footprint. Inside the museum, visitors can stroll through the main hall, one adjacent hall for special and temporary exhibitions, and three additional halls for temporary special exhibits. The building also houses an auditorium, an international baroque salon, library, shop, and restaurant, in addition to management offices, a restoration workshop, and storage spaces.

Related: Toyo Ito awarded 2013 Pritzker Prize

mexico, toyo ito, Museo Internacional del Barroco, Federico Bautista Alonso, art museum, baroque museum, unesco world heritage site, Atlixcáyotl Territorial Reserve

The impressive architecture of the museum doesn’t have to be enough to make it a world landmark, though. Its location is already designated as a UNESCO world heritage site, spanning almost 12.5 acres in the Atlixcáyotl Territorial Reserve, in the country’s fourth largest city. As recently as 2014, the museum project was in danger of not being completed, as planners had been denied then necessary environmental permits to build on the UNESCO site. Fortunately for art lovers, project managers were able to make accommodations in the design to satisfy environmental standards, and construction was allowed. Just two years after the project seemed doomed, it officially opened to visitors in February 2016.

+ Toyo Ito & Associates

Images via Luis Gordoa and Toyo Ito & Associates