solar thermal system, thermal cells, solar thermal heat, thermoslate, natural slate, slate tiles, slate roof, slate flooring, cupa pizarras, spain, solar heat, hot water, heated pool

Harnessing the sun’s warmth to heat water is an approach fading in popularity in many places where solar power is already used, but it still makes sense for especially sunny places like Spain. Because natural slate is dark in color, it attracts the sun’s heat, and a rooftop sheathed in Thermoslate tiles can, according to the company’s website, provide up to two-thirds of a home’s hot water needs annually. Other homes with Thermoslate rooftops are reducing energy consumption by as much as 85 percent annually.

Related: Spain reveals plans for first public streetlight system powered by wind and sun

solar thermal system, thermal cells, solar thermal heat, thermoslate, natural slate, slate tiles, slate roof, slate flooring, cupa pizarras, spain, solar heat, hot water, heated pool

The tiles can be used for an attractive roof covering, a beautiful slate floor, or even outdoor wall cladding. For rooftop applications, there are two different options for installation method—one with nails, much like traditional roof tiles, and another using hooks that make it possible to slide the slate tiles out. The hook method allows for easier maintenance and repair because, although natural slate is quite durable, roof tiles can become damaged over time.

The innocuous appearance of the Thermoslate system make it a good match for historic renovation projects because, once installed, it’s nearly impossible to detect a difference from a traditional slate tile rooftop.

Via Treehugger

Images via Cupa Pizarras