green design, eco design, sustainable design, global warming, record temperatures, warmest Christmas, Climate Change
WSI Forecast

It seems the East and West Coasts have done some sort of Freaky Friday switch this Christmas, with peculiar weather conditions for each region. Weather maps for this Christmas Eve and Christmas Day have a lot of people seeing red, with record highs blasting through many parts of the East Coast. Meanwhile the West Coast is suffering a deep freeze, creating the wackiest weather map we’ve seen in a long time- a literal divide of blue and red.


green design, eco design, sustainable design, global warming, record temperatures, warmest Christmas, Climate Change
WSI Forecast

The wild weather maps coming out this week look more like a child’s coloring book than actual weather patterns. Deep hues of frigid blue meet waves of pinks and reds, meeting in a diagonal line across the central part of the country. The East Coast continues the trend of the last six months, blasting through record highs in Boston, New York City, Buffalo, Washington DC, Atlanta, Cleveland, Orlando…and the list goes on and on. In New York City, the forecasted temperature for Christmas Eve, 72-73F, is just a few degrees below the city’s temperature in July, which was 75F. Some areas on the East Coast are blasting 30 degrees through their average temperature!

Related: Antarctica records what may have been its hottest day ever

Meanwhile, the West Coast is experiencing frigid dips in a cold front stretching from Baja California upward to Vancouver and eastward to the Midwest. In a completely unbelievable turn, Los Angeles will be colder than New York on Christmas day, with temperatures in the high 50s.

green design, eco design, sustainable design, global warming, record temperatures, warmest Christmas, Climate Change
National Weather Service

The blue and red map converges in a less pretty meeting, in the Midwest, where the two weather systems are causing unstable conditions. Severe storms and tornadoes could be expected during Christmas week, a typical weather condition only seen in summer months.

Via Gizmodo