Singapore just took a green leap forward with the SkyVille housing complex, uniting communities together with an eco-friendly, un-gated design. Architecture firm WOHA included a public plaza and garden in the heart of the high-rise structure, demonstrating that “high density can be high amenity,” while solar-power, daylighting, and a prefabricated design reduce the building’s environmental impact.

skyville, singapore architecture, woha, patrick bingham-hall, passive design, prefabricated design, solar roof, community living, passive housing, communal space, solar powered housing

A collection of 80 homes surround a vibrant community garden at SkyVille, each available in three different layouts from a prefab design. What the structure lacks in complication, it makes up for in amenities. While walking to and from each apartment, residents are treated to a view of the garden terrace below and various communal living spaces throughout the complex.

skyville, singapore architecture, woha, patrick bingham-hall, passive design, prefabricated design, solar roof, community living, passive housing, communal space, solar powered housing

Related: This plant-covered Singapore skyscraper is the tropical building of the future

The plaza, which is open to the public, includes a supermarket, coffee shop, and several retail shops. Residents have access to a childcare facility, as well as fitness center and rooftop jogging track. Nearby pavilions, which s illuminate the jogging track with a photovoltaic array, are equipped to host weddings and other events for the public. Passersby can also enjoy community artwork cast right into the walls by a local designer.

A 150 meter-long bioswale borders the outdoor space and the entire structure was constructed with passive features in mind. All of the apartments and lobbies are naturally lit and ventilated and the common areas are powered by rooftop solar power. For its efforts, SkyVille was awarded a Platinum Greenmark rating – the highest available for public housing in Singapore.

+WOHA

Via ArchDaily

Images via Patrick Bingham-Hall