When working on an expansion project in the north end zone at Resser Stadium at Oregon State University, the last thing construction crews were expecting to find was a field full of bones. But on Monday, they unearthed a massive woolly mammoth femur in the construction zone. The city that hosts the university, Corvalis, is located 72 miles south of Portland and was once the site of a prehistoric bog that attracted the large mammals about 10,000 years ago.

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That incredible find wasn’t the only discovery. As crews continued to dig, they found bones from several other extinct mammals as well. Loren Davis, an associate professor of anthropology at OSU, wasn’t surprised by the find. He said that sick animals would often seek out bodies of water and die there, so groups of bones are fairly common. There were no human bones or artifacts found during the dig, so unfortunately it’s not considered part of an archaeological site.

Related: Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells

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Davis hopes to learn more about the ancient environment of the Willamette Valley by studying the bones. Because they weren’t in great shape to begin with, they’ll need to be soaked in water to prevent further deterioration, and then they’ll be sent for carbon dating to learn more about their age. His students’ next assignment? Digging through the pile of rubble leftover from the dig to find any other bones that were overlooked by the construction crew.

+ Oregon State University

Via NY Daily News

Images via Oregon State University