Lori Zimmer

World's Largest Solar Bridge Complete in London

by , 01/23/14

green design, eco design, sustainable design, photovoltaic panels, solar bridge, world's largest solar bridge, solarcentury, Blackfriars Bridge, Network Rail

At long last, the world’s largest solar bridge at London’s Blackfriars station is finally complete. Solarcentury and England’s Network Rail partnered to cover the bridge with 4,400 photovoltaic panels. Formerly an energy hog, the bridge now provides Blackfriars station with half of the energy it requires to operate.



green design, eco design, sustainable design, photovoltaic panels, solar bridge, world's largest solar bridge, solarcentury, Blackfriars Bridge, Network Rail

The Blackfriars solar bridge stretches across the River Thames, transporting thousands of commuters every day from South London out of one of the busiest stations in the city. The station already accommodates electric trains, which make public transportation even more green, but with the new solar bridge that took five years to complete is expected to make the station even more sustainable. First Capital Connect, which runs Blackfriars, estimates that the 4,400 photovoltaic panels will divert 511 tonnes of carbon emissions each year, drastically reducing the station’s carbon footprint.

Aside from providing renewable energy to the station, the Blackfriars bridge will also serve as a symbol of London’s quest to be a more sustainable city. The photovoltaic panels can be seen from both sides of the river, inviting tourists and locals to think about renewable energy. Solarcentury designed the bridge to incorporate the photovoltaic panels every step of the way, making a point that renewable energy is not an after thought. Instead, it comprises a crucial element of the design.

+ Solarcentury

+ Network Rail

Via Business Green

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1 Comment

  1. Ron Newman January 27, 2014 at 1:20 pm

    So the solar panels take care of roughly half the energy Blackfriars consumes? The other half could easily be supplied with wind and/or hydro power. A series of VAWTs (the most efficient I’ve found is the KOHILO –a prototype of which is shown on Facebook) alone would do the job! And proveably more cheaply too.

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