Casa Rosset, geothermal energy, zero energy, zero energy home, De Carlo Gualla Architects, Italian Alps, Aosta, solar energy, low-emission glazing, passive principles, passive house, heat pumps, timber louvers

De Carlo Gualla Architects had two main goals in designing Casa Rosset. The first was to develop a spatial organization that responded to the needs of the clients, instead of merely copying the traditional arrangement that lumped all the rooms under a single roof. In the end, the architects adopted a village-like spatial model that divides the home into four separate but interconnected units. The layout, made up of “separate nuclei all linked to communal spaces,” helps accommodate multi-generational living as well as overnight guests.

Casa Rosset, geothermal energy, zero energy, zero energy home, De Carlo Gualla Architects, Italian Alps, Aosta, solar energy, low-emission glazing, passive principles, passive house, heat pumps, timber louvers

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The second architectural goal was to construct a building with a minimal energy footprint. The architects applied passive design principles to Casa Rosset, which is built into the side of a mountain, allowing the earth to naturally insulate the home. Natural light penetrates the home through the many glazed openings, while timber louvers shield the low-emission glazing from the harsh sun. The zero-energy home generates energy through geothermal, heat pumps, and solar power sources.

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Images via De Carlo Gualla Architects