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eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, natural beauty, eco-beauty, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, snake venom, snails, sheep, placenta, leeches, gold, diamonds, fish

SNAKE VENOM

Simulated viper’s venom may be a bit of a fake out in the natural beauty stakes, but it’s by no means any less mind-boggling. “Syn-Ake” is the key constituent of UltraLuxe 9, an anti-aging potion used by Beverly Hills dermatologist Sonya Dakar Skincare, whose celebrity clientele includes Drew Barrymore, Fergie, and Gwyneth Paltrow. The $185-per-ounce cream works by blocking the neurotransmitters that tell muscles to contract, just shy of an amount that would leave you completely paralyzed.

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BULL SEMEN CONDITIONER

Hari’s, an upscale salon in London, touts its Aberdeen Organic Bull Semen Treatment as “Viagra for hair.” The protein-rich hair mask drenches follicles in a combination of Aberdeen Angus bull semen and Katera root. Remember when conditioning with mashed-up avocado felt a little kooky?

eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, natural beauty, eco-beauty, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, snake venom, snails, sheep, placenta, leeches, gold, diamonds, fish

SNAIL SLIME

The latest miracle ingredient being touted? Snail slime. And we’re not talking about scarfing down the occasional escargot. Slathered on in cream or gel form, mollusk mucus is said to cure a variety of ills, including acne, scars and burns, and of course, wrinkles.

eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, natural beauty, eco-beauty, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, snake venom, snails, sheep, placenta, leeches, gold, diamonds, fish

HUMAN PLACENTA EXTRACT

Trying to regain the ruddy, fulsome skin you had as a baby? You’re not aiming high enough. For a complexion so creamy it’s positively embryonic, try someone’s afterbirth. EMK Placental has brewed up an entire range of products from postnatal issue—including face masks, eye gels, and hair serums—that celebs like Jennifer Lopez, Eva Longoria, and Madonna are rumored to partake of. (We’re told that the company has since rejiggered the formula with plant-based ingredients, however.)

eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, natural beauty, eco-beauty, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, snake venom, snails, sheep, placenta, leeches, gold, diamonds, fish

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LEECH THERAPY

Hollyweird is right. In 2008, actress Demi Moore gushed to David Letterman about her trip to Austria, where she suckled a quartet of medical leeches to detoxify her blood. “Really? Leech. Actual…leeches? Like the blood-sucking…” Letterman asked. “Yes. Blood,” Moore replied. “I’m feeling very detoxified right now.”

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eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, natural beauty, eco-beauty, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, snake venom, snails, sheep, placenta, leeches, gold, diamonds, fish

GOLD FACIAL

All that glitters may not be gold but this 24-karat facial is as gilded as they come. UMO, a Japanese firm that originated the Midas treatment, claims applying gold leaf to your skin will diminish wrinkles and fine lines, stimulate cell growth, lighten age spots, and revitalize your countenance.

eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, natural beauty, eco-beauty, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, snake venom, snails, sheep, placenta, leeches, gold, diamonds, fish

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FISH PEDICURES

Why labor with a pumice stone when you can have hundreds of tiny fish feasting away at your foot calluses? All the rage in Asia, the exfoliation treatment harnesses the toothless chompers of tiny carp, known as Garra rufa, to nibble at dead, flaking skin. If that sounds downright unsanitary, you’re not alone. Several cosmetology boards came to the same conclusion, resulting in at least 14 states banning the procedure.

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DIAMOND PEEL

If a gold facial isn’t decadent enough, consider polishing your mien with a handful of crushed diamonds and rubies, which allegedly—and we use that term loosely—work as antioxidants for your skin. Black Swan thespian Mila Kunis was said to have racked up $7,000 on a single procedure, just before she stepped out on the red carpet at the 2011 Golden Globe Awards.

eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, natural beauty, eco-beauty, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, snake venom, snails, sheep, placenta, leeches, gold, diamonds, fish, bull semen, bee venom

BEE VENOM

Proclaimed as the holistic alternative to Botox, purified bee venom is rumored to have acolytes such as Kylie Minogue, Victoria Beckham, and the Duchess of Cambridge. Marketed by Manuka Doctor in New Zealand, the so-called “api-therapy” is described as a skin-renewal treatment that nurtures cellular regeneration and renews damaged skin cells.

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SHEEP EMBRYO INJECTIONS

In 2007, Blondie frontwoman Debbie Harry admitted to using injections made from the embryos of black sheep. “They would take from different organs: from the liver, from the glands, from the bone, and they would make up these injections,” she told the Daily Mail. “There were 11 injections, and I thought it was marvelous.”