Looks like Abercrombie & Fitch has another “situation” on deck, only this time it has nothing to do with getting the cast of Jersey Shore to doff its merch. The American retailer is among 14 global brands Greenpeace is calling out for allegedly releasing hormone-disrupting chemicals—specifically nonylphenol ethoxylates—into the environment. Used as surfactants in textile production, NPEs subsequently break down to form toxic nonphenol, an endocrine disruptor that builds up in the food chain and is pretty nasty even at minute levels.

Greenpeace, Adidas, Abercrombie & Fitch, Ralph Lauren, H&M, Uniqlo, Converse, Puma, Adidas, Nike, Calvin Klein, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, toxic pollution

MORE DIRTY LAUNDRY

Research commissioned by the activist group uncovered NPE in garments by Abercrombie & Fitch, Adidas, Calvin Klein, Converse, G-Star RAW, H&M, Kappa, Lacoste, Li Ning, Nike, Puma, Ralph Lauren, and Uniqlo, according to a new report released today.

A sequel of sorts to an earlier Greenpeace report, Dirty Laundry 2: Hung Out to Dry tackles a global problem affecting the entire textile industry: water pollution.

A sequel of sorts to Greenpeace’s first Dirty Laundry report six weeks ago, Dirty Laundry 2: Hung Out to Dry implicates the companies in a global problem that affects the entire textile industry: water pollution.

“Our research shows that global clothing brands are responsible for the discharge of hazardous chemicals into waterways in China and across the world, as part of their manufacturing processes,” Yifang Li, a toxic-water campaigner at Greenpeace East Asia, says in a statement. “People have a right to know about the chemicals that are present in the very fabric of their clothing and the harmful effects these chemicals have when released into the environment.”

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Greenpeace, Adidas, Abercrombie & Fitch, Ralph Lauren, H&M, Uniqlo, Converse, Puma, Adidas, Nike, Calvin Klein, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, toxic pollution

WRUNG OUT

Since the release of the first report, Nike and Puma have pledged to work with their suppliers to eliminate the release of toxic effluent from their supply chains. But other brands remain in Greenpeace’s sights. “By failing to take action to eliminate these chemicals, global brands like Adidas are expecting customers to do their dirty laundry for them,” Li says. “Every time clothes containing these chemicals are washed, hazardous substances are released into waterways across the world.”

Since the release of the first report, Nike and Puma have pledged to work with their suppliers to eliminate toxic effluent from their supply chains.

Manufacturers need to remove these chemicals from their products, Li says. The best way to do so? “Eliminate them from their production processes and to come clean about what chemicals their factories are using and discharging,” she adds. Until then, Shore fans, we suggest GTL’ing in something else.

+ Dirty Laundry 2

+ Greenpeace