Photos by Net-a-Porter

Things are about to get hairy between Barneys New York and the Humane Society of the United States. The animal-rights group claims the luxury retailer passed off a fur-trimmed 3.1 Phillip Lim parka as faux, despite the fact the pelt was most likely belonged to a coyote. The offending article was sold not only online but also at Barneys’ Manhattan flagship store, a violation of a three-year-old New York law that requires all genuine fur to be labelled as such.

3.1 Phillip Lim, fur, animal cruelty, faux fur, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, Barneys, Barneys New York

FUR KEEPS

Mislabeled fur is more common than not, according to the Humane Society, largely because of a loophole in the nearly 60-year-old federal fur-labeling law. In February, the organization sued Neiman Marcus, Lord & Taylor, Macy’s, and Saks Fifth Avenue for pawning off raccoon dog fur as synthetic. “A hardcore group of heartless holdouts continues to peddle raccoon dog coats to unsuspecting consumers,” said Jonathan Lovvorn, the Humane Society’s chief counsel for animal-protection litigation, when the suit was filed.

A new bill signed this month by President Obama will make falsely advertising animal fur as fake a crime.

A new bill signed this month by President Obama, however, will make such false advertisements a crime. Taking effect in March, H.R.2480, the Truth in Fur Labeling Act, will require all garments made with animal fur to include the correct species origin on their labels. Flouting the law can result in up to a $5,000 fine and imprisonment for one year.

3.1 Phillip Lim, fur, animal cruelty, faux fur, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, Barneys, Barneys New York

CRIME OF FASHION

“Consumers have a right to know what they are buying,” said Pierre Grzybowski, manager of the Humane Society’s Fur-Free Campaign, in a statement. “The Humane Society of the United States calls on Barneys to take immediate action to ensure that unsuspecting consumers are not duped into purchasing animal fur when they intend to purchase a cruelty-free alternative.”

Barneys has since removed the coat off its website and sales floor and is “investigating the matter.”

Barneys has since removed the coat off its website and sales floor and is “investigating the matter.” A spokeswoman for 3.1 Phillip Lim told NBC New York that the collar was labeled as real coyote fur in Japanese—just not in any other language.

+ Press Release

+ Humane Society of the United States

[Via The Discerning Brute]