I, ANDROID

Android Wear will also allow you to control other devices from your wrist, say, firing up a music playlist on your phone or streaming your favorite movie—via Google’s Chromecast, natch—on your television.

“We’re only at the beginning; we’ve barely scratched the surface of what’s possible with mobile technology,” says Pichai.

The possibilities for Android-powered wearables are infinite, according to Pichai. “We’re only at the beginning; we’ve barely scratched the surface of what’s possible with mobile technology.” he says. “That’s why we’re so excited about wearables—they understand the context of the world around you, and you can interact with them simply and efficiently, with just a glance or a spoken word.”

To encourage app-building, Google has opened up a preview of its new OS to developers. Pichai says the company is already working with several consumer-electronics manufacturers, including Asus, HTC, LG, and Samsung; chip-makers such as Broadcom, Imagination, Intel, Mediatek, and Qualcomm; and even fashion brands like the Fossil to bring Android Wear-powered watches to market later in the year.

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Motorola’s Moto 360, which is due to drop sometime this summer, uses the appearance of a traditional analog watch to disguise its high-tech underpinnings. It’ll also boast premium materials (leather, stainless steel, sapphire glass), wireless charging, and interchangeable straps.

+ Moto 360 by Motorola

+ Android Wear