Music festivals create more than merriment and boozy afterglows; they also generate a prodigious amount of trash. Lisa V├ąglund, a recent graduate of the Danish Design School, pitched a solution, transforming discarded tents from the Roskilde FestivalÔÇöone of the six biggest annual music festivals in EuropeÔÇöinto stage costumes for singer and festival staple Kissey Asplund.

Lisa V├ąglund, Made in School, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, sustainable style, upcycled fashion, upcycled clothing, recycled fashion, recycled clothing, festival tents, Kissey Asplund

Photos by Christian H├Âgstedt

ADAPTIVE REUSE

The amount of trash left behind after the festival both shocked and troubled V├ąglund, inspiring her upcycled creations. ÔÇť[The garbage] has become a bigger and bigger problem for the festival because they spend a lot of money on cleaning up the area,” she tells Ecouterre. “It usually takes them three months every year!”

The amount of trash left behind after the festival both shocked and troubled V├ąglund, inspiring her upcycled creations.

V├ąglund’s goal was two-fold: To make a statement about the festival’s litter problem while creating new looks for Asplund to perform in. “In the end, itÔÇÖs the visitors that pay for it,” V├ąglund says of the massiveÔÇöand expensiveÔÇöcleanup operation. “But the money could be spent on better things like booking more artists.ÔÇŁ

+ Tent Project

+ Lisa V├ąglund