Scraps: Fashion Textiles and Creative Reuse, Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, upcycled fashion, recycled fashion, recycled accessories, upcycled accessories, recycled clothing, upcycled clothing, recycled textiles, upcycled textiles, eco-fashion exhibits, Matilda McQuaid, Susan Brown, Luisa Cevese, Dosa, Christina Kim, Riedizioni, Reiko Sudo, Nuno, Muji, eco-textiles, eco-friendly textiles, sustainable textiles, eco-fabrics, eco-friendly fabrics, sustainable fabrics

SCRAP WORK

“Telling the inspiring and empowering stories of three women designers and entrepreneurs who hail from three continents, Scraps brings critical focus to the human and environmental costs of fashion consumption while also offering viable solutions for reducing waste and raising awareness,” Caroline Baumann, director of the museum, said in a statement. “Installed in the museum’s Design Process Galleries, the exhibition will be an illuminating display of design ingenuity.”


Scraps highlights more than 40 examples of creative ingenuity, many of which combine time-honored craft traditions with the newest advances in the recycling process.


Organized by Matilda McQuaid, deputy director of curatorial and head of textiles, and Susan Brown, associate curator of textiles, Scraps highlights more than 40 examples of creative ingenuity, many of which combine time-honored craft traditions with the newest advances in the recycling process.

Pieces on display include tabletop accessories and handbags composed of silk selvage scraps, appliquéd panels derived from reclaimed jamdani saris, and assorted textiles woven from kibiso, a luxury fiber whose commercial and creative value is even greater than the silk-spinning byproducts that begot it.

Scraps was made possible through grants from Eileen Fisher, which has dabbled in “closing the loop” on its own apparel, the Coby Foundation, and Ryohin Keikaku Co., which owns Muji.

+ Scraps: Fashion, Textiles, and Creative Reuse

+ Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum