Predicting the future, like spotting trends, is a tricky proposition, but that hasn’t stopped people—including us—from attempting to squint beyond the veil. The latest sartorial crystal-ball slingers, Levi Strauss & Co. and the U.K. nonprofit Forum for the Future, have jointly released a report painting four possible scenarios of what the trillion-dollar global apparel, accessories, and luxury goods market will look like in 2025. You don’t have to wade through reams of dull statistics to get the gist of Fashion Futures’ call to action for the industry, however. A quartet of digestible animated videos make envisioning these futures a cinch, from a world where slow fashion reigns supreme to one where production is localized to the point of xenophobia.

Fashion Futures 2025, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, Levi Strauss, Forum for the Future, future fashion

SLOW IS BEAUTIFUL

The first possible future presents a world of political collaboration and global trade, marred only by a “gray economy” that exists for people who refuse to conform to the new, slower ideal. People own fewer but higher-quality clothing, clothes are cared for sans chemicals, and vintage or secondhand pieces are well-circulated.

People own fewer but higher-quality clothing and vintage pieces are well-circulated.

Most workers are paid a living wage, used clothes are shipped and remanufactured in Japan, and digital tagging helps us keep track on where our clothes come from and the impact they’ve had. People also don “smart” clothes, which monitor health and wellness.

+ Slow is Beautiful

Fashion Futures 2025, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, Levi Strauss, Forum for the Future, future fashion

COMMUNITY COUTURE

Although the world in the second scenario is struggling to cope with climate change and the ensuing resource shortages, community bonds remain strong and geared toward self-sufficiency. Because of the high costs of raw materials and disrupted supply chains, the production of new clothing has plummeted dramatically.

“Make do and mend” becomes our mantra once again and nothing is disposed of.

The clothes we wear are now either secondhand, handmade, on the black market, or from “clothing libraries” that rent sought-after looks. “Make do and mend” becomes our mantra once again and nothing is disposed of—when we’re done with our clothes, we sell them back for reuse.

+ Community Couture

Fashion Futures 2025, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, Levi Strauss, Forum for the Future, future fashion

TECHNO-CHIC

In this prosperous, high-tech utopia, fashion is fast, lightweight, and inexpensive. Our clothes are just as technologically savvy, comprising advanced yet low-impact materials that incorporate nanotechnology and lab-grown components. Three-dimensional body scanners allow us to try on clothes in interactive mirrors, while tour operators arrange “holiday wardrobe” packages that include a selection of local fashion on your arrival—all pre-selected virtually, of course.

Our clothes comprise advanced yet low-impact materials that incorporate nanotechnology.

Clothing is now made by machines, rather than people, which poses the downside of underemployment in the manufacturing industry. Modular clothing, produced in China, is delivered to stores, where you can customize them as you wish. (Likewise, crowd-sourced fashion, which is voted upon online before it goes into production, reduces overproduction and wastage.) When our clothes no longer suit our needs, they are composted, disassembled, or remanufactured.

+ Techno-Chic

Fashion Futures 2025, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, Levi Strauss, Forum for the Future, future fashion

PATCHWORK PLANET

Divided into economic and cultural “blocs” with Asia at the fore, this future faces strong nationalist tendencies, along with conflict over dwindling resources. On the upside, material scarcity has spurred innovations such as clothes grown from bacteria cellulose and coatings that render garments self-cleaning.

Xenophobia is rampant; in most of the Middle East, Western clothing is verboten.

Fabrics become exclusive to their locale: bamboo in Asia, flax in India, and wool in Australia. The way we care for our clothes also differs according to region—some blocs have developed waterless washing machines, while others use coatings that limit the need for cleaning.

Because clothes are now made in regional factories, they reach us more quickly. Xenophobia is rampant, however, and in most of the Middle East, Western clothing is verboten.

+ Patchwork Planet

+ Fashion Futures