Low-quality, mass produced furniture is piling up in the landfills. Seattle-based furniture brand Keeps has taken a stand to produce sustainably sourced, affordable and long-lasting furniture to counter the “fast-furniture’” culture. They recently released their first bedroom pieces.  

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A person sitting up on a bed covered in a gray bed

Keeps is a result of the dedicated efforts of Cofounder Andrew Cheng’s journey through education and training as a designer. The experience saw him move from California to Berlin, back to California and eventually to Washington. When his college furniture looked worse for wear after multiple moves, he decided to put his degree to good use. As a result, he started creating furniture that can be assembled and disassembled countless times. 

Related: Keep furniture out of landfills with help from Inhabitr

The side of a white bed with a wooden frame in a brick walled room

“The innovation behind Keeps comes from the everyday challenges around me,” Cheng said. “The brand aims to solve a lifestyle issue that I and many others experience, especially as the renting population continues to grow.” 

The bedroom collection currently includes the Keeps Bed, Headboard, Platform Bed and Nightstand. The classic designs are complemented by modern interlocking assembly techniques that require no tools. 

A white bed on a wooden frame against a brick wall

Located in the notably environmentally-focused Pacific Northwest contributes to Keeps’ dedication to sustainable material sourcing. Keeps’ products are built from solid oak. Additionally, they are available in natural and smoke stain options. The wood comes from FSC-certified forests and is domestically sourced. Also, Keeps donates 100 trees through Eden Reforestation Projects for every bed sold. 

A wooden nightstand furniture willed with books below it beside a bed

Furthermore, durability is at the core of each furniture design, both to achieve high-quality products and to minimize waste. Since Keeps’ furniture is designed to be repeatedly taken apart and put back together, individual part replacements further reduce waste. However, the product may outlast the preferences of the owner. As a result, early next year, Keeps plans to launch its buy-back program. This will allow customers who no longer want their items to sell it back to the company where it will be refurbished and resold. 

A white bed on a wooden frame sitting in the middle of a forest

“We want to implement our take-back concept from the get-go and have that commitment with customers who purchase from us today and in 10 years,” Cheng said. 

+ Keeps Furniture

Images via Keeps Furniture