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The four-story building is impossible to miss thanks to the larger-than-life and fairly accurate subway map painted on its exterior with a cheeky red circle pointing out that “YOU ARE HERE.”

Related: Eye-tricking “windows” at NYC subway station give the illusion of looking into an underground park

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The NYC transport theme carries through into the interior with white subway tiles used in the common spaces and inside the units. The entranceway is clad in corrugated tin and lit with industrial lighting, while the stairway is painted a subway green and the walls on each level are decorated with images of NYC subway scenes. Mock subway platform edges complete with bright yellow rumble strips lead into each apartment.
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Although the eye-catching facade is certainly the star feature of the project, there is some controversy brewing behind the design. Apparently, amateur cartographer and lawyer Jake Berman published the original artwork on Wikipedia only to have the building’s owners use it without his permission.

Jonathan Greenspun, a spokesman for the building’s realtor, All Year Management, said that they  are trying to contact the artist to give him proper credit. “After speaking with the designer we now realize a portion of Mr. Berman’s artwork was used,” Greenspun said. “The developers will reach out to Mr. Berman to make sure he is properly credited with the design.”

Via Gothamist

Images via Zillow