Margate Residence, Zero Energy Design, resilient design, resilient nj home, net zero home, AirPLUS certifications, low energy homes, hurricane resistant design, storm resistant design, hurricane sandy, jersey resiliency, storm resistant shutter system, triple glazed windows, Rainwater systems, weather insulation, Solar electric system

After their house was heavily damaged by 2012’s Hurricane Sandy, the owners of the Margate residence wanted to rebuild with resiliency in mind, but not at the cost of comfort. Accordingly, the architects implemented a number of energy-saving and storm-resistant features into the 2,600-square-foot residence, but without sacrificing the home’s charm.

Margate Residence, Zero Energy Design, resilient design, resilient nj home, net zero home, AirPLUS certifications, low energy homes, hurricane resistant design, storm resistant design, hurricane sandy, jersey resiliency, storm resistant shutter system, triple glazed windows, Rainwater systems, weather insulation, Solar electric system

The home’s eco-friendly and storm-resistant strategies were seamlessly blended into its aesthetics. For example, the home is elevated four feet above grade to minimize the risk of flooding, but the extra height is hidden thanks to strategic landscaping. Additionally, the windows are all equipped with a protective shutter system to shield them from flying debris in case of severe winds.

Margate Residence, Zero Energy Design, resilient design, resilient nj home, net zero home, AirPLUS certifications, low energy homes, hurricane resistant design, storm resistant design, hurricane sandy, jersey resiliency, storm resistant shutter system, triple glazed windows, Rainwater systems, weather insulation, Solar electric system

For its energy needs, the family counts on a 5kW solar electric system, which provides 60% of the electricity the family uses. Energy loss is limited thanks to the home’s cellulose and continuous rigid insulation and triple-pane windows. In fact, the residence consumes only about 15% of energy when compared to a new home built to current energy code requirements.

On the interior, high-efficiency fixtures and appliances were installed to conserve water usage. However, one would find it difficult to focus on this aspect because the interior design is so attractive. The large open floorplan is flooded by natural light, giving the home an airy, refreshing feel.

+ ZeroEnergy Design

Via Houzz

Images via Zero New Energy Design. Photography by Eric Roth Photography