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In a recent interview with Curbed NY, America explained why his chose to display his art in the abandoned tunnel. “Gallery space in New York, like any other big city in the world, is nearly unaffordable to an artist. If we want to show work we have to have the support both financially and logistically of the art world,” he explained. “In some way we have to give up power which ultimately leads to us giving up our voice and the art itself gets lost and diluted in the process.”

Related: Chuck Close and Sarah Sze to Create Site-Specific Artwork for Second Avenue Subway
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America also shared that the process of installing his subway artwork was no easy task. The illicit details include gaining access to the tunnel to get a feel for the space, running through the tunnel on live tracks, and carrying quite a bit of materials along the way such as a generator, lights and all of the artwork. And yes, he has been chased by the MTA on occasion.

As far as alienating those who would like to see the exhibition due to the hard-to-reach location, well, the artist says that he’s confident that determined urban explorers will make it there if they want to see it badly enough.

The Perilous Fight will remain on display until someone takes it down.

+ Phil America

Via Curbed NY

Images via Phil American website