Bates Masi + Architects, Long Island homes, WWII lookout, nautical homes, cedar construction, long island, architecture, long island architecture, resilient homes

Features such as elevated decks, spacious windows, and open storage rooms are borrowed accents from the nearby life-saving station, which had elevated decks and massive windows to help workers watch for invaders and sailors in need of help. The station also had large, open rooms with boats and tools hanging from rafters, so the home features similar elements.

New york architecture, house design, historic house, historic architecture

Across the street from the property sits a century-old life saving station that has been preserved. During WWII, the station was used to as rescue base for sailors and was once even instrumental in discovering Nazi invaders attempting to come to shore. “By taking cues from the historic lifesaving station, the home responds to the environmental and historical context. In so doing, it honors the local heritage and enriches the present day experience.”

Bates Masi + Architects, Long Island homes, WWII lookout, nautical homes, cedar construction, long island, architecture, long island architecture, resilient homes

Mimicking this open-rafter concept, the stairs are hung from steel beams, a wood-burning stove sits on a suspended steel shelf and a chair and lamps are hung from the home’s beams.

Related: Resolution 4 Architecture Builds a Sustainable Cedar-Clad Seaside Escape on Fire Island

Bates Masi + Architects, Long Island homes, WWII lookout, nautical homes, cedar construction, long island, architecture, long island architecture, resilient homes

The home features cedar siding, much like the rescue station. “On the exterior, a system of bronze bars was developed to hang the thick cedar siding boards in place without fastening through the wood, allowing the boards to expand and contract naturally with changes of temperature and humidity.”

+ Bates Masi + Architects

Via Contemporist

Images courtesy of Contemporist