The four pavilions of the Naked Gallery resort in China were built using a combination of locally available natural and recycled waste materials. Xiaohui Designer Studio designed the complex as an eco-friendly space that “includes 75% of sustainable and renewable materials, 75% recyclable materials, and 75% of work by local craftsmen.”

Naked Gallery, eco-resort, China, Xiaohui Designer Studio, waste material, bamboo, recycled material, waste, natural building materials, traditional building techniques, green architecture

The designers utilized locally available stones, the soil excavated from the other sites in the resort, and bamboos abundant at the foot of Mount Mogan where the resort is located. The materials of the formwork and the joists of Naked Gallery are collected from the waste materials from other structures, which helped reduce the generation of waste and alleviate the influence of the architecture on the natural environment.

Naked Gallery, eco-resort, China, Xiaohui Designer Studio, waste material, bamboo, recycled material, waste, natural building materials, traditional building techniques, green architecture

Related: Luscious eco-resort design in China inspired by the Silk Road

The resort consists of four pavilions. Local craftsmen built the complex using traditional building techniques which helped cut construction costs and increase construction efficiency. In fact, the transportation fees and construction waste were both cut by 90% during the building process.

+ Xiaohui Designer Studio

Via Archdaily

Photos by Youkun Chen

Naked Gallery, eco-resort, China, Xiaohui Designer Studio, waste material, bamboo, recycled material, waste, natural building materials, traditional building techniques, green architecture

Naked Gallery, eco-resort, China, Xiaohui Designer Studio, waste material, bamboo, recycled material, waste, natural building materials, traditional building techniques, green architecture

Naked Gallery, eco-resort, China, Xiaohui Designer Studio, waste material, bamboo, recycled material, waste, natural building materials, traditional building techniques, green architecture