Sean Yoro has a passion for creating art on precarious surfaces, but this time the intrepid street artist – who paints on a surfboard in the water – had to contend with 28-foot tide changes to create his latest piece. Yoro (known as Hula) has just unveiled a mural of a woman that disappears underwater when the tide rises (about one foot every 15 minutes) in Canada’s Bay of Fundy.

Most of Yoro’s work is usually done in undisclosed locations for legal reasons, but this time, the artist was invited by the team behind Discover Saint John to create the mural on Minas Basin, an inlet in the Bay of Fundy. The task was not easy, however, considering the area can have 28-foot tide changes in a single day.

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Needless to say, even though he didn’t have to skirt authorities this time around, it wasn’t easy painting the 30 by 45 feet mural. “It was really challenging to adapt to the tide changes, from the dangerous rip currents to the quick rate of rising and dropping water levels, averaging 1 foot every 15 minutes,” Yoro told CNN. “I had to use several calculated formulas to know the rate of the tides coming in or out every day, and use this information to know what speed I could paint for that tide change, which helped (me) pace myself in order to get the proper details finished in the figure.”

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Another major challenge was finding paint that would adhere to the concrete wall in such damp conditions. He was determined to use nontoxic paint for environmental reasons, but had to experiment with various types mixed with sealers to come up with a special formula that would dry quickly and withstand the water levels as he worked.

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Unfortunately, Yoro’s beautiful artwork is sure wash away. The mix of sun, saltwater, and algae will most likely eat away at the paint over time, but Yoro hopes his work will last at least two or three months.

+ Sean Yoro

Via CNN
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Sean Yoro, street mural, underwater art, underwater streetmural, surf artists, Bay of Fundy, tide art, Hula mural, nontoxic paint, Minas Basin mural, bay of fundy artwork, street art, public art, water art, surf art,
Sean Yoro, street mural, underwater art, underwater streetmural, surf artists, Bay of Fundy, tide art, Hula mural, nontoxic paint, Minas Basin mural, bay of fundy artwork, street art, public art, water art, surf art,
Sean Yoro, street mural, underwater art, underwater streetmural, surf artists, Bay of Fundy, tide art, Hula mural, nontoxic paint, Minas Basin mural, bay of fundy artwork, street art, public art, water art, surf art,