It’s no secret that artificial intelligence is trending worldwide, which is why it is also a prominent component of CES 2019. But as interest in futuristic tech grows, so does consumer interest in fresh, local food. The farm-to-table concept continues to gain popularity, which is why Panasonic has proposed an innovative mash-up of these two seemingly polar opposites — an AI mobile delivery service that operates like an ice cream truck to bring local fruits, vegetables and other grocery items directly to you.

fake foods on display behind glass counters

SPACe_C eMart is part of Panasonics broader model of mobility solutions called SPACe_C. This particular concept is just that — a proof of concept idea that, once it gains investment, could quickly and easily become a reality. Unlike many current food delivery services, the eMart would not only just deliver fresh produce, but also teach consumers precise information about the specific products they buy.

Related: 5 simple ways to reduce your food waste right now

fake fish on display behind glass counter

The mobile delivery service would operate like an ice cream truck, traveling through neighborhoods and central locations to make it easy for consumers to pick up groceries, say, on their way home from work or just before preparing dinner.

fake pork on display behind glass counter

Each grocery item would be equipped with a QR code that could share information on expiration dates as well as notify users if the item is organic or GMO and where it came from. The truck would also feature a unique, refrigerated cabin that would use precise temperature and humidity controls for each type of food to ensure optimal freshness. These high-tech controls and food life cycle tracking systems would be powered by AI.

fake fruits on display behind glass counter

The overall goal of the SPACe_C eMart is to bring fresh, local and healthy foods to consumers in an efficient manner, but we imagine this design could also be implemented further to help provide fresh produce and food education to food deserts and underserved communities.

+ Panasonic

Photography by Inhabitat