This mirrored alpine tiny house disappears into the landscape — until it’s needed by mountaineers in distress. Sofia-based firm Lusio Architects designed the net-zero mountain shelter with smart sensors that emit light and sound in low-visibility conditions. The structure is easily transported by helicopter and can be assembled on site in nearly any type of landscape, making it an ideal sanctuary for hikers.

Hikers walk past the net zero shelter

The design, which won the “Architecture of 2050” competition, includes a combination of various components to assist in the rescuing and lodging of mountaineers in distress. The shelter is highly-insulated by the aluminum-clad modules, and a floor heating system — powered by solar and wind energy — provides heat throughout the interior.

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A strong feature of the shelter is its ability to be broken up into separate sections. This makes the structure easily transportable by helicopter. Its subtle aluminum coating exterior camouflages the structure into the landscape when not in use. If bad weather hides the structure from view, the shelter’s automatic system of smart sensors emit light and sound and act as a beacon for lost hikers. The lights change modes depending on the situation — if a person needs help, the cabin emits a “FIND ME Mode” or a “RESCUE ME Mode,” and in times of non-emergencies, there is a “RELAX Mode.”

The net zero shelter in the snow

Inside, hammocks are stored in the walls, providing multiple beds for those in need. Additionally, the shelter has a direct video system that can put anyone in immediate contact with mountain rescue teams. The prototype is slated to be installed in Vitosha, Bulgaria in late 2018. Depending on its success at that location, another shelter will be created for the Bulgarian Antarctic Institute at its base in Antarctica.

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Via Archdaily

Four scenarios for using the shelter

Layout of the Net Zero Shelter