Kristine Lofgren

Spanish Island to be Powered by 100% Renewable Energy

by , 05/07/14

El Hierro, El Hierro renewable energy, El Hierro green energy, El Hierro energy independent, Canary islands renewable energy, Canary Islands green energy, Canary Islands, Canary Islands energy independent, wind energy, island wind energy, water turbine energy, island water turbine energy, El Hierro wind energy, El Hierro water turbine energy, El Hierro water reservoirs, renewable energy, energy independence, green energy

A tiny Spanish island with just 10,000 residents is about to do something amazing. El Hierro, the smallest of the Canary Islands, plans to completely sever ties with the traditional power grid and move entirely to renewable energy. The island plans to become completely self sufficient next month when its 11.5 megawatt wind farm kicks into gear. El Hierro already has a water turbine that generates electricity, and the added wind power will enable the island to go totally off-grid.

El Hierro, El Hierro renewable energy, El Hierro green energy, El Hierro energy independent, Canary islands renewable energy, Canary Islands green energy, Canary Islands, Canary Islands energy independent, wind energy, island wind energy, water turbine energy, island water turbine energy, El Hierro wind energy, El Hierro water turbine energy, El Hierro water reservoirs, renewable energy, energy independence, green energyImage via Jose Mesa

We wrote about El Hierro a few years ago when the island announced its plans to move over to renewable energy. In the meantime, the island has been busy at work implementing its ideas and is finally ready to make the shift. Between the water turbines and the new wind farm, the island will have enough power for all of its residential needs – including the water desalinization plants on the island – by the end of next month, with enough extra to ensure electricity even if the wind dies down.

Related: El Hierro: The World’s First Renewable Energy Island… or is It?

The island actually generates enough power for its residential needs with just the water turbines, but the wind power allows El Hierro to have a little extra power, which will be used to pump fresh water from near the harbor on the island to a reservoir in a volcanic crater 2,300-feet above the sea. When there is not enough wind for electricity needs, that water will be released to feed down into the water turbines to generate more energy, so the island will always have enough power to keep things running.

Via ENN

Lead image via Wikimedia Commons

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


5 Comments

  1. Barbarian Bolton June 13, 2014 at 4:40 am

    scottg: the reason we ask why? or how? is because we’d have to cover 40% of the UK in windfarms to power what we currently have. That’s impossible. It’s a useful energy source on small scales, but overall it will never produce the overall power that fossil fuels do. It’s sad, I know, but until we figure out a way to stop us humans burning stuff (nuclear fusion, fission) we’re pretty much stuck with what we’ve got. Sorry if that sounds pessimistic, but if you want to better the world in any way, study a science and help develop something new.
    Oh, and shut up about immigration!! :-)

  2. scottg scottg June 3, 2014 at 5:20 am

    It can be done in England. London, Manchester, Birmingham. Instead of spending money on new housing (due to immigration) we can use that space to create renewable energy farms/areas which will produce jobs and will benefit the economy.

    Also, with combined sustainable tech then things will just get better – such as the solar roads or pavements.

    I think people need to stop thinking ‘why?’ or ‘how?’ and think ‘why not’ and just give it a go.

  3. Mary Wazelle June 2, 2014 at 9:32 am

    This is proof of concept for the rest of the planet to see what\\\’s really possible with sustainable energy and without greedy little monopolies predicated on scarcity, passed off as utility.

    It\\\’s time to transition to a resourced based economy, people.

  4. Barbarian Bolton June 2, 2014 at 7:50 am

    Without sounding cynical, because it’s a beautiful thing, but creating enough power for 10,000 people on a small island should be simple. Creating enough power for London with 8.3 million people is much more of a concern. Then how about powering the whole of the UK – a reasonably small island?

  5. Damian Dolan May 7, 2014 at 5:45 pm

    fantastic news ;^), hope sets the way for local power generation for combination of hydro and wind, all the best dD

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home