Gallery: BIOWAVE: Biomimicry Solution for Ocean Power

 

Biomimicry – or designs based on natural systems – is one of the most intriguing methods for designers and engineers to create innovative and efficient solutions to problems. Inspired by forms and functions found in nature, this approach to sustainable design allows for environmentally friendly solutions for energy, waste reduction and a bevy of other design challenges. Using biomimicry as the guiding design principle, the Australian firm BioPower Systems has developed Biowave: an ocean power system that harnesses energy by mimicking the motion of underwater plants in the ocean currents to generate electricity. Biowave mimics the swaying motion of the sea plants found in the ocean bed. The system looks like three buoyant blades which are constantly oscillating to the motion of the sea. As they sway in the tide, electricity is generated. If at any point the system is in danger because of the strong currents, it simply lies in flat until the ocean calms down.

BioPower Systems is currently testing a prototype off the coast of Tasmania. A prototype unit of 250kw will inform the company on how to best deploy a larger scale system which in turn is expected to provide power to Flinders and King islands, and in the future, if successful, the entire state of Victoria, home of the city of Melbourne.

+ Biowave system by BioPower

+ Biomimicry on Inhabitat

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


5 Comments

  1. gontier June 14, 2013 at 4:28 pm

    This sounds like a very attractive solution to energy generation – a surefire success if placed in ocean water that is deep enough not to interfere with boats and shipping. And wouldn\\\’t it be even sweeter, if the same ends could be achieved by using the motion of biologically grown super-seaweeds instead of mechanical automatons that may be plagued by maintenance problems. I would still like to see someone invent a system of directing tidal flow, upwards into sluiceway tubes and funnels that contain turbine systems, which could be closed off for maintenance purposes, above sea-level on land – coastal energy production farms that shelter calm lagoons behind them, and which serve to protect against the effects of land erosion by diffusing tidal energy, allowing seawater with spent force to fountain out at the top of arced sluiceway tubes/cones to fall back depleted of energy, onto the surface of the sea. Then again, maybe your invention is cheaper and more practical.

  2. couva66 October 6, 2011 at 10:16 am

    I WOULD LIKE TO SEE A VIDEO OF THIS BIOVALVE IN OPERATION AND WHAT IS NEED TO IMPLIMENT THIS I LIVE ON A SMALL ISLAND IN THE CARIBBEAN POPULATION 60.000 HAS TWO OCEAN AND I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF IT WOULD BE FEASABLE TO USE THIS SYSTEM THERE

  3. Manjiri August 18, 2011 at 10:08 am

    It’s too good! keep it up.

  4. msandeep9999 June 15, 2008 at 12:23 am

    how is the energy produced

  5. 4abtrlife May 17, 2008 at 9:04 am

    This is great news. If wind power can do it, so can oceanic movements. Hurry up scientists, we can’t afford $4 gas no more. I passed $100 y’day for the first time!

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home