Gallery: DIY: How To Make a Hanging Bonsai String Garden

Living in a tiny apartment doesn't mean you need to forego plants and gardening -- there are dozens of ways to add greenery to brighten up your space. Kokedama, a style of Japanese bonsai, offers a beautiful and low-maintenance option that any urban gardener
 
Living in a tiny apartment doesn't mean you need to forego plants and gardening -- there are dozens of ways to add greenery to brighten up your space. Kokedama, a style of Japanese bonsai, offers a beautiful and low-maintenance option that any urban gardener can master. Translating to "moss ball," kokedama are made by removing your plant from its pot and placing it in a ball of soil held together with moss and string.  Wilder Quarterly, a new Brooklyn-based magazine geared toward contemporary gardeners and growers, shared with us the simple step-by-step instructions to make this elegant hanging string garden. Wilder is also offering Inhabitat readers a 15% discount on subscriptions or single issues - find the code and discount details after the jump!

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2 Comments

  1. dsanfrancis June 15, 2012 at 8:54 pm

    I can’t imagine how an orchid would fair in soil, even fast draining soil. I’ve seen a few pictures online of phalaenopsis and oncidium kokedama but no explanations on whether they hold up well or eventually suffer from root rot. Any idea?

  2. yanggers February 7, 2012 at 11:42 pm

    Nice article. Bonsai soil media is not Akedama, it’s Akadama.

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