Nicole Jewell

Fly Factory: Icelandic Man Makes Pate and Dessert With the Larvae of Soldier Flies

by , 05/06/14

Búi Bjarmar Aðalsteinsson's Fly Factory, insect larvae production, innovative inventions, sustainable food, sustainable food production, edible bugs, insects as food, insect factories, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations,  Icelandic Academy of the Arts

Thinking of starting a protein-heavy diet this spring? Why not take it a step further and add a bit of insect larvae pate or dessert to the mix? Thanks to design student Búi Bjarmar Aðalsteinsson’s Fly Factory, you can now enjoy some tasty protein-rich meals and desserts made from the delicious larvae of black solider flies.



Búi Bjarmar Aðalsteinsson's Fly Factory, insect larvae production, innovative inventions, sustainable food, sustainable food production, edible bugs, insects as food, insect factories, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, Icelandic Academy of the Arts

Aðalsteinsson says he was inspired to create the Fly Factory by a 2013 report from the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation called Edible Insects. The report examines possible ways to reduce world hunger, specifically by using insects as a source of protein.

Related: The Lepsis is a Terrarium for Growing Edible Bugs at Home

The Fly Factory uses the larvae from the black soldier fly, which is regarded one of the most sanitary flies in existence since it has no mouth and does not eat food. Once collected in the micro-factory larvae house, the flies feed on organic food waste and excrete nutrients that are subsequently used to make fertilizer. “The larvae are given organic waste and become rich in fat and protein, which then can be harvested for human consumption,” says Aðalsteinsson. “The larvae also produce a clean and nutrient-rich soil, which is subsequently drained into compost canisters and then used for spice and herb production.”

The Icelandic Academy of the Arts student says that the Fly Factory is built with used materials and produces no waste in the larvae-to-table process. Designed as his graduate project, Aðalsteinsson says that his innovative design is meant to be used for restaurants and the food processing industry versus private use.

Via Dezeen

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